Cookies

Like most websites The Medicine Maker uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Manufacture Formulation, Small Molecules

Natural Concern

This article was published in our sister publication, The Small Molecule Manufacturer, which celebrates the field of small molecule drug development and manufacturing with interviews and articles focusing on success stories, equipment, and new processing techniques. Read more about The Small Molecule Manufacturer here https://themedicinemaker.com/manufacture/small-but-never-forgotten

Maria Luisa Rodriguez, Global Program Head for the development of nifurtimox at Bayer.

Chagas disease – described by the WHO as “silent and silenced” – is a public health concern for developing countries in Latin America where it is endemic. It is caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, which is carried and spread by insects. Although the symptoms of the disease vary, it is responsible for approximately 14,000 deaths each year (1) and, given that the majority of people affected by the disease are children, appropriate treatments are needed. The Medicine Maker spoke to Bayer’s Maria Luisa Rodriguez, Global Program Head for the development of nifurtimox, about the challenges posed by treating children affected by Chagas disease – and how the industry could more effectively address the needs of pediatric patients with neglected diseases.

Why is pediatric drug development so important?

At the core of the pharmaceutical industry’s motivations is giving people a fair chance at life. This should begin by ensuring that children are able to lead healthy lives with necessary treatments available to help see them through periods of illness. As a parent and a person who works in the pharmaceutical industry, it is important for me and those who I work with to find solutions to the medical problems faced by children, regardless of whether they have chronic illnesses or acute conditions.

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Medicine Maker’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Medicine Maker magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Maryam Mahdi

Associate Editor

After finishing my degree, I envisioned a career in science communications. However, life took an unexpected turn and I ended up teaching abroad. Though the experience was amazing and I learned a great deal from it, I jumped at the opportunity to work for Texere. I'm excited to see where this new journey takes me!

Register to The Medicine Maker

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Medicine Maker magazine

Register