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Manufacture Process Control, Small Molecules, Facilities

The Phoenix of Process Innovation

Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) once employed as many as 30,000 people in Teesside in the North East of England. The company’s history dated back to the 1920s and the demolition of its three 100 m cooling towers in 2012 signaled the end of an era for a region – and a community – defined by their industrial heritage.
 
Similar stories can be seen the world over. From the US “Rust Belt” to the industrial heartlands of Southern Ontario, Canada, to Bergslagen, Sweden, globalization has led to industrial decline, which can, in turn, influence social and economic issues.
 
Globalization is arguably one of the defining political issues of our time, with governments across the developed world thinking about how to reduce geographic inequality and create stable jobs in former industrial regions. One big hope for advanced economies is creating jobs in high value, high productivity industries, such as pharmaceutical manufacturing. The big stumbling block? The inherent risk of innovation.

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About the Authors

James Strachan

Over the course of my Biomedical Sciences degree it dawned on me that my goal of becoming a scientist didn’t quite mesh with my lack of affinity for lab work. Thinking on my decision to pursue biology rather than English at age 15 – despite an aptitude for the latter – I realized that science writing was a way to combine what I loved with what I was good at.

From there I set out to gather as much freelancing experience as I could, spending 2 years developing scientific content for International Innovation, before completing an MSc in Science Communication. After gaining invaluable experience in supporting the communications efforts of CERN and IN-PART, I joined Texere – where I am focused on producing consistently engaging, cutting-edge and innovative content for our specialist audiences around the world.


Stephanie Sutton

Making great scientific magazines isn’t just about delivering knowledge and high quality content; it’s also about packaging these in the right words to ensure that someone is truly inspired by a topic. My passion is ensuring that our authors’ expertise is presented as a seamless and enjoyable reading experience, whether in print, in digital or on social media. I’ve spent seven years writing and editing features for scientific and manufacturing publications, and in making this content engaging and accessible without sacrificing its scientific integrity. There is nothing better than a magazine with great content that feels great to read.

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