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Manufacture Technology and Equipment, Small Molecules, Ingredients

To Be Continued...

This article was published in our sister publication, The Small Molecule Manufacturer, which celebrates the field of small molecule drug development and manufacturing with interviews and articles focusing on success stories, equipment, and new processing techniques.

Read more about The Small Molecule Manufacturer here

Why is continuous manufacturing such an important strategy for drug manufacturers?

For years, the industry has struggled to shorten drug development cycles but many have found themselves limited by the capabilities of batch operations. Requiring less space and resources, continuous manufacturing offers companies the opportunity to manufacture drugs in one facility with a single rig. A major advantage of continuous is that rigs can run for longer when larger batches are needed without the need for scale-up. This could lead to potential savings in API over the course of the entire development cycle (although the API requirement in the early stages of development may be higher). The ability to run development in the same site also means that there is no need to transfer analytical methods and it cuts out the back and forth that often comes when such services are outsourced to other companies.

Big pharma companies are leading the way in proving that the equipment required for continuous operations can also help in lowering footprint. Pfizer’s PCMM (portable, continuous, miniature and modular) platform and GEA’s CDC50 are also strong examples of the portability of continuous manufacturing equipment and its ability to be used in train with minimum modifications to manufacture using dry compression, dry granulation or wet granulation. PCMM and CDC50 have also been used to alternate between tableting and capsule filling. 

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