Cookies

Like most websites The Medicine Maker uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Business & Regulation Trends & Forecasts, Supply Chain, Business Practice

Ask, and Ye Shall Receive

Britain’s departure from the European Union becomes a little less theoretical with each passing day. There was something poignant about the scenes in London last month, as EMA staff lowered the 28 EU flags in preparation for the Agency’s move to Amsterdam. Whatever one thinks about Brexit on the whole, the loss of 900 highly skilled staff-members as well as the MHRA’s leading role in European medicines regulation is hardly good for the UK. At best, it’s collateral damage; at worst, it’s like watching a “British success story” being broken up, as Mike Thompson, ABPI CEO, put it (1).

For me, the lowering of the flags symbolized Britain’s separation from the EU’s regulatory sphere – something the pharma industry was almost unanimously against (2). And something the UK government was hoping to avoid (in terms of pharmaceuticals), by asking to remain part of the EMA despite the contradiction with the its red line against single market membership.

The fact that the government would suggest such a thing implies that industry lobbying does have an impact. And though “no deal” is still on the table (I’ve been speaking to companies in the drug development space about their “no-deal” preparations – here), negotiations won’t end on March 29 – there will be much still to play for.

The idea behind the formation of the EMA – hosted by London since 1995 – was to reduce the cost and time incurred by companies seeking separate approvals in each member state. By reversing this act of harmonization, companies will naturally seek approval in the larger EU market first, leading to delays for the UK. Will Brexit also reverse the process of global regulatory harmonization (a fear expressed by Ezequiel Zylberberg here)? Or perhaps an independent UK could work with regulatory bodies around the world to increase harmonization amongst the larger markets... Either way, Britain will have to innovate to compete.

I believe this is what Mike Thompson meant when he said that Brexit would be a catalyst for positive change (3). He also told me: “politicians have great skill in going to the precipice and then turning back.” As a very steep drop approaches, and the consequences for the industry begin to crystalize, let’s hope he’s right on both counts.

Enjoy our FREE content!

Log in or register to gain full unlimited access to all content on the The Medicine Maker site. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Medicine Maker magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

  1. The Guardian, “Britain loses medicines contracts as EU body anticipates Brexit” (2019). Available at: bit.ly/2LRtR9C. Accessed February 6, 2019.
  2. J Strachan, “Hold Me Closer, UK Pharma”, The Medicine Maker (2018). Available at: bit.ly/2GpCs4k.
  3. J Strachan, “The Successful Experiment”, The Medicine Maker (2018). Available at: bit.ly/2DbEv9d.

About the Author

James Strachan

Over the course of my Biomedical Sciences degree it dawned on me that my goal of becoming a scientist didn’t quite mesh with my lack of affinity for lab work. Thinking on my decision to pursue biology rather than English at age 15 – despite an aptitude for the latter – I realized that science writing was a way to combine what I loved with what I was good at.

From there I set out to gather as much freelancing experience as I could, spending 2 years developing scientific content for International Innovation, before completing an MSc in Science Communication. After gaining invaluable experience in supporting the communications efforts of CERN and IN-PART, I joined Texere – where I am focused on producing consistently engaging, cutting-edge and innovative content for our specialist audiences around the world.

Register to The Medicine Maker

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Medicine Maker magazine

Register