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Manufacture Business Practice, Formulation, Small Molecules, Trends & Forecasts

Nanoformulations: Reach for the (Micro)Sun!

The market for nanoformulated medicines is growing at a significant rate – with an expected value of $350.8 billion by 2025 (1). There is also an abundance of research taking place in the field. Nanomedicines refer to cargos of therapeutics at the nanoscale and may exist as nanoparticles, nanocrystals or other formulations. Manufacturing nanomedicines – and deciding on the best delivery method – is challenging because of the very thing that makes them special: their nanosize. Indeed, significant issues with reproducibility plague nanomedicines, and there have been high failure rates in translating nanomedicines from the bench to the clinic. Today, a growing focus on microfluidics looks to provide enhanced process control and predictability.

Here, we speak with Caroline Kelly, Technology and Innovation Officer at the UK’s Centre for Process Innovation (CPI), to find out how microfluidics and improved process control can give a boost to the future of nanomedicines.

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About the Author

James Strachan

Over the course of my Biomedical Sciences degree it dawned on me that my goal of becoming a scientist didn’t quite mesh with my lack of affinity for lab work. Thinking on my decision to pursue biology rather than English at age 15 – despite an aptitude for the latter – I realized that science writing was a way to combine what I loved with what I was good at.

From there I set out to gather as much freelancing experience as I could, spending 2 years developing scientific content for International Innovation, before completing an MSc in Science Communication. After gaining invaluable experience in supporting the communications efforts of CERN and IN-PART, I joined Texere – where I am focused on producing consistently engaging, cutting-edge and innovative content for our specialist audiences around the world.

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